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Posts Tagged ‘Amos and Andy’

Disclaimer: For those who are not familiar with the old time radio team of Amos ‘n’ Andy, one must be warned that the radio program, although the most popular radio program in the early days of radio, is highly controversial today, as it portrayed African-Americans in a negative manner, often resorting to stereotypes. For this reason, some people may find the following content offensive, but it has been published here for archival purposes, as it is a part of American and old time radio history and represents lost/missing episodes from the series.

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April 18, 1930

“2 Girls, 2 Dates and Andy; Woe is He, and Why Not?” 

Tonight all will be known.  Millions of radio fans are waiting anxiously to learn which date Andy kept last night.  Did he go to see Susie, or did he go to see Madame Queen?

When the episode ended last night, the great question had not yet been decided.  Amos and Brother Brown, as you remember, spent their first 10 minutes trying to decide how the impasse could be gotten around.  They tried forward impasses and even lateral ones, but at the finish they had to throw a coin.

It was Andy’s idea.  “Heads it’s Madame Queen,” he says, taking that last dime out of his pocket, “an’ tails it’s Susie.”

“Awa, awa, it’s tails,” cries Amos, “now you gotta see Susie.”

Andy looks at the coin on the floor for a minute.  His expression is thoughtful.  You can almost hear him scratch his head.

“Amos,” he finally says, “ah guess we better make it two out of three.”

All joking aside, however, this woman business is gettin’ serious.  Last night, for instance, it almost caused a break between the Damon and Pythias of radio.  Andy, you know, proposed that he’d go around to Susie’s for supper, then Amos would show up and take Susie to the dance while Andy went calling on Madame Queen.

The only thing wrong with that idea was Amos.  Amos didn’t think so much of it.  In fact, he wouldn’t have nothing to do with it.  Andy got pretty hot over that.  Just wait till Ruby Taylor comes to town and Amos has a date on that night.  He won’t get any help from Andy.

But Amos, he says he don’t get his dates mixed that way.  But we all make mistakes and we’ll see what happens when Ruby finally arrives.

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Disclaimer: For those who are not familiar with the old time radio team of Amos ‘n’ Andy, one must be warned that the radio program, although the most popular radio program in the early days of radio, is highly controversial today, as it portrayed African-Americans in a negative manner, often resorting to stereotypes. For this reason, some people may find the following content offensive, but it has been published here for archival purposes, as it is a part of American and old time radio history and represents lost/missing episodes from the series.

Baby Snooks

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April 17, 1930

“It’s a Double Play, the Madame to Susie, and Whoever Wins, Andy Will Be Out”

Tonight’s the night, and Andy’s got to either sink or swim.

His women trouble has been gittin’ worser and worser every day and now he’s really in for it.

Last night the hot water he is in got even hotter.  It all came about when Susie called him up and invited him for supper.  Sho’, he’d come; he’d even take her to a dance afterwards.

But it also came to light last night that that “traveling salesman” is going to leave town today.  And you know what that means.  That means, most likely, Madame Queen will be calling Andy up some time today and asking him to come around and see her tonight.

Who’s it going to be—the Madame or Susie?

Another thing about last night’s episode.  Andy’s back at his old trick of brow-beating Amos.  Now he wants to make the ‘pore little fellow sign a contract.  One of those things with “party of the first part party of the second part” in it.

And you can bet your bottom dollar Andy’s going to be the party of  the first part.

Anyhow, Amos don’ wanna be under contract.  He don’t like “that under business.”  As he told Andy last night, he was under a bond one time and hereafter he’s going to be “on top” of any “contacts” he signs.

(Now, folks, get all ready for 7 o’clock tonight.  There’s going to be the devil to pay if Andy don’t watch his contacts, too.)

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Disclaimer: For those who are not familiar with the old time radio team of Amos ‘n’ Andy, one must be warned that the radio program, although the most popular radio program in the early days of radio, is highly controversial today, as it portrayed African-Americans in a negative manner, often resorting to stereotypes. For this reason, some people may find the following content offensive, but it has been published here for archival purposes, as it is a part of American and old time radio history and represents lost/missing episodes from the series.

 Amos and Andy

269 episodes of Amos 'n' Andy on 3 mp3 CDs!

April 16, 1930

“That Laugh—That Long Juicy Laugh—Was Amos’—He Was Laughing at Andy”

Things sure have changed with Amos ‘n’ Andy.

Shortly after 7 o’clock last night, millions heard a laugh come over the radio.  It was a long laugh, a fat juicy laugh.  It was, in fact, a horse laugh full of crescendos and embrodered with chuckles.

And folks, that laugh was not Andy’s.  It was Amos making that unseemly sound.

Poor little downtrodden Amos enjoying for the first time, the last laugh.  This may mark a new era in the relations of the Fresh Air Taxi partners for it is believed to be the first time Amos has ever had the laugh on Andy.

Amos burst out almost immediately last night when Andy started squawking about his telephone conversation with Madame Queen the night before.  You remember how Amos, answering the phone, turned it over to Andy, and Andy, thinking Susie was on the other end, got in hot water with the Queen.

Well, he isn’t getting any sympathy from Amos.

Andy also is on the verge of getting in dutch with Susie and her mammy.  He’s got to come through with a raincoat he promised the latter and it’s about due to arrive C. O. D.  He counts his money and he’s only got $1.10 after adding and “minusing.”  He thinks the postman can put him in jail and tells Amos so.

Amos’ condolence is another horse laugh.

But, despite all these troubles, you can’t break Andy’s big front.  Right at the most desperate moment last night, while Andy was looking dismayed at his dollar and dime, Susie calls up.   She wants to know what her big boy’s been doin’.

With that offhand, deprecating pomposity of his, Andy says:

“Oh, I’se just been sittin’ around here countin’ up my revestments.”

“Sho, sho,” chimes in Amos.

(Andy is going to need more than pomposity if that queen woman shows up tonight.)

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Disclaimer: For those who are not familiar with the old time radio team of Amos ‘n’ Andy, one must be warned that the radio program, although the most popular radio program in the early days of radio, is highly controversial today, as it portrayed African-Americans in a negative manner, often resorting to stereotypes. For this reason, some people may find the following content offensive, but it has been published here for archival purposes, as it is a part of American and old time radio history and represents lost/missing episodes from the series.

Amos 'n' Andy

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Tuesday, April 15, 1930

What is Ol’ Andy Going to Tell Madame Queen?

If 20,000,000 radio fans hear a peculiar, hollow-sounding laugh tonight when they turn on the dial at 7 sharp, it’s just about 20,000,000 to 1 that it’ll be Andrew Brown, the well-known taxi magnate, trying to laugh off that sweligant siren of Harlem, Madame Queen.

And if you know anything about Madame Queen, you know laughing her off is some job; a job for a hyena, as Amos might say. The truth is, as nearly everybody who listened in last night is aware, Andy is in a jam.

Course it’s all Amos’ fault. It always is. But if Andy is going to have woman trouble, he can’t expect Amos to be keeping his women apart for him. Last night, for instance, Amos ‘n’  Andy were talking over Andrew’s heart failures in the office of their taxi company.

Seems Madame Queen been treating Andy pretty shabbily of late, what with paying attention to that “traveling man” of hers and not giving Andrew a date. So, it turns out, Andy’s going around to see Susie. No use trying to fool himself, he’s still in love with that Queen woman, but just the same he’s going around to see Susie soon as she phones and lets him know whether her Mammy is going t’ be t’ home.

Well, you can guess what happened. They sits around waitin’ for that call to come in and it finally comes. Amos, he’r right by the phone, so he answers “Sho, sho, Andy’s right here; yes, indeedy, jus’ hol’ de line,” he gushes.

Up steps Andy to the receiver nonchalantly. He clears his throat. He pauses, and you can almost hear him wink at Amos, as he begins:

Good evenin’, Miss Susie; I’se relighted to hear from you!”

A sudden hush. Then a funny rasping sound like the noise of a telephone being torn out of the wall. At last you hear the frightened, squeaky voice of poor little Amos:

“Dat war’nt Susie, Andy; dat was Madame Queen.”

Tonight Andy’s got to laugh it off–if he can.

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Hollywood Gossip

PPG = Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
TB = Toledo Blade
TM = Time Magazine

One night Barbara [Hale] was particularly tired after a heavy day’s work at the studio.  She called Bill [Williams] to warn him of her mood, saying, “Please don’t say anything to me when I get home tonight.  I’ve had a terrible day.” . . . . . When she arrived Bill was prepared.  He had signs up through the house reading: “Hello, Honey,” “Leave your clothes on the bed, I’ll hang them up,” “Are you hungry?”  Finally as he pranced by with signs which read “Yet?” “Yet?” “Yet?” Barbara laughed. . . . . “I could have cried that night,” she says.  “I wanted to lock myself in a room and scream.  If I hadn’t forwarned Billy we might have had a squabble.  As it turned out, we had a barrel of fun.”  –TB: 09-18-1949

Click image to see all merchandise bearing the De Forest Audion design.

Click image to see all merchandise bearing the "De Forest Audion" design.

At 76, Lee de Forest, who sometimes wonders why he ever invented radio’s audion tube, made a birthday wish: that the FCC enforce its ban on “those mediocre giveaway programs” and, while going about it, slap one on soap operas too. –TM: 09-05-1949

Two veteran jazz bandleaders unburdened themselves on bebop.  Sniffed schmalzy Guy Lombardo: “It’s laid a big egg.  As a matter of fact, it’s nothing.  I don’t even know what they’re doing, do you?”  Snapped Swingman Tommy Dorsey:  “I don’t like bebop, and I admit it.  I don’t know anything about it, and I don’t like the look of the people that do.” –TM: 09-05-1949

Besieged by a crush of autograph hunters at a Paris swimming meet, ex-Olympic Champion and ex-Tarzan Johnny Weissmuller fainted dead away.  –TM: 09-05-1949

HOLLYWOOD, Sept. 17:  Richard Dix, 54, former film star remains in grave condition, his physician said today.  –PPG: 09-18-1949

 

Born:  To Freeman Gosden, 50, long-suffering “Amos” of radio’s perennial Amos ‘n’ Andy, and Jane Stoneham Gosden, 25, half-sister of the New York Giants’ President Horace Stoneham:  their first child (he has a son and daughter by a previous marriage), a son; in Los Angeles.  Name: Craig Leigh. Weight: 5 lbs. 4 oz. –TM: 09-12-1949

Married:  Hubert Prior (“Rudy”) Vallee, 48, oldtime crooner (Your Time Is My Time), now a Hollywood character actor (I Remember Mama); and Eleanor Kathleen Norris, 21, University of California (’49) psychology graduate; he for the fourth time; in Oakland, Calif. –TM: 09-12-1949

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Roses and Thorns

Organ at Night

Dear BCE:  I am for E.S.T.’s suggestion to give Jack Martin a night spot on the air with his organ music.  Roses, and lots of them, for Jack.  I don’t agree with the persons who wrote that organ music is tiresome, but I do contend that a couple of hours of “he swings and misses” is tiresome.  H.E.K., Milwaukee. . . . Let’s have some organ music along about 9 or 10 in the evening.  H.H. Milwaukee. . . .  Organ music at night would be devine.  Do let’s have it.  R.E.M., Milwaukee.

More Amos ‘n’ Andy

Dear BCL:  We want Amos ‘n’ Andy at 10 o’clock.  Most people are working around the kitchen and can’t listen.  Give the mothers a chance to listen.  Mrs. H.J.A., Granville, Wis. . . .  My work does not permit me to listen to Amos ‘n’ Andy at 6 o’clock.  Therefore, I suggest that WTMJ keep them at 10 p.m.  Give us working people a break.  A.K.M., West Bend, Wis. . . .  Put Amos ‘n’ Andy on the air at 10 p.m.  We would miss them very much if they were not put at the usual time.  I. Koule, Milwaukee. . . .   People who work in offices are not home at 6 p.m. and if they are, they are at dinner and can’t hear Amos ‘n’ Andy.  The housewife, too, is preparing dinner and cannot listen at 6.  All people are not dormice who retire at sunset and not all people let children have preference over adults.  If some of these algelic “kiddies” were put in their place we would not see so many saucy brats ruling their parents.  Mrs. M.C.S., Milwaukee.

About Mr. Bartlett

Dear BCL:  Just a word—a whisper—about Thomson Bartlett.  I wish he wouldn’t puff so when he announces.  He gives me the impression that he runs to the “mike” to make his announcements.  At the end of a long sentence, his voice fairly rasps.  Especially his ng’s.  He makes them sound like “ng” with a sawie rasp.  H.L. Devine, Milwaukee

McElroy’s Roses

Roses to Bob McElroy’s sweet band.  It is no wonder at all that Bob is having the longest engagement of any of the other orchestras.  None of them could ever hope to compare with Bob’s perfect orchestra.  A.C., Milwaukee. . . .  Here’s a shower of roses for Bob McElroy and his splendid aggregation.  Wouldn’t think of missing one of his broadcasts.  Best of luck to him and his lads.  K.L., Milwaukee. . . .  Bushels of roses to Bob McElroy’s orchestra and vocalists.  Never miss any of their programs.  M.T., Milwaukee.

Lovely Lady of the Air

Dear BCL:  I listen to the Lovely Lady of the Air at every opportunity.  This morning I was particularly pleased to hear her conduct her own program.  Such a lovely speaking voice.   I feel it should be heard as often as possible.  I do hope she will do this again.  Ruth Wilson, Racine, Wis.

Roses to Garrity

Dear BCL:  Roses to Bob Garrity and his Sophisticates, especially roses to the piano player and vocalist, both are fine.  It is the best band we have heard over WTMJ.  Wish we could hear them in a program of music other than dance.  Mr. and Mrs. R.J. Kelly, Fort Atkinson, Wis.

Liked “Detroit” Program

Dear BCL:  Despite the fact that I am a confirmed radio fan and enjoy good programs consistently, I have never taken the time to thank any artist or sponsor.  But words cannot describe the feelings I experienced when I listened to “On to Detroit.”  It brought back memories better than anything that has elapsed since the Red Arrows were demobilized.  Please thank the Red Arrow veterans who arranged it.  George W. Gessert, Plymouth, Wis.

Misses Art Krueger

Dear BCL:  I just had to let you know how much we miss Art Krueger and his excellent band.  There certainly is a dark, bleak spot on WTMJ wince Art and his boys left the Vanity cafe.  Roses to them.  Len Fleisher, Menasha, Wis.

The Milwaukee Journal

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August 24, 1939

RADIO
Day by Day

By C. E. Butterfield
Associated Press Radio Editor

New York, Aug. 24—Short wave signals from overseas, so poor for about 12 hours that reception for network relay was almost impossible, seemed to have resumed normal status from noon on yesterday.  As a result program after program dealing with crisis was produced.

The difficulty encountered, due to magnetic disturbances, was not nearly so prevalent for the greeting of King Leopold of Belgium to the seven-power peace conference in mid-afternoon.  However, by night-fall, the difficulty had recurred, although the forecast is that reception will continue fair to good the rest of the week.

Today the chains arranged to continue as desirable their cancellation of regular programs to let in overseas broadcasts.  This morning close attention from 7:30 on was being paid to Prime Minister Chamberlain’s address to parliament, followed by the scheduled 10-minute statement at 2:30 p.m. (WHAS) from London on all networks by Foreign Secretary Halifax.  A recording of this statement is to be rebroadcast by MBS-chain at 8:15 tonight.

The advance schedule for tonight has these broadcasts:

WEAF-NBC
5:30—John Gunter from Riga, Latvia.

WJZ-NBC
5:45—Yvon Delbos from Paris—WEAF-NBC, 7 hour’s European Roundup.  Other broadcasts are expected.

Programs Tonight:

WEAF-NBC
5:15—Luther-Layman Singers.
6:00—Rudy Vallee Hour—WFM-WLW.
8:00—Bob Burns Show—WSM-WLW.
9:15—Dance tunes.

WABC-CBS
5:30—Joe E. Brown.
6:00—Jim McWilliams Quiz—WHAS-KMOX.
7:00—Major Bowes Amateurs—WHAS-KMOX.
8:00—Workshop play “Meridian 7-1212”—WHAS.

WJZ-NBC
6:30—It’s Up to You.
7:00—Toronto Symphony.
8:00—Drama, 1001 Wives.
8:30—Grant Park Concert.

MBS-Chain
7:30—Sinfoinetta.
8:30—Weber Concert Revue.

What to Expect Friday:

WEAF-NBC
11:15 a.m.—Let’s Talk It Over.
1:45 p.m.—Guiding Light—WSM-WLW.
4:15—Malcolm Claire’s Stories.

CBS-Chain
2:30 p.m.—Herbert Donaldson, concert piano.
3:30—Davis Cup tennis.
4:45—Whitman Cup tennis—WHAS (Also WJZ-NBC 4:15).

WJZ-NBC
10:30 a.m.—Farm and Home Hour—WSM-WLW
12:30 p.m.—Rhythm School.
2:00—Club Matinee—WLW.

MBS-Chain
2:00 p.m.—Salzburg Music Festival.

Over WHAS and KMOX

7:30 p.m.—First Nighter.
8:00—Grand Central Station.
8:30—Bob Ripley.
9:00—Amos ‘n’ Andy.
9:15—The Parker Family
9:30—Johnny Presents.
11:00—Orchestra.

Over WSM and WLW
1:00 p.m.—Story of Mary Martin
1:15—Ma Perkins
1:30—Pepper Young’s Family.
9:00—Fred Waring.
10:30-11:30—Dance Music.

Kentucky New Era

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